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Legal Fiction

Does the Government own the product of your labor?

Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery.

Nobody but our Selves can FREE OUR MIND!!!!

NO MAN CAN OWN! ANOTHER MAN!

Therefore No Man can OWN the Fruits of ANOTHER MANS LABOR!!! Bitches…

Pollock v. Farmers’ Loan & Trust Company, 157 U.S. 429 (1895), affirmed on rehearing, 158 U.S. 601 (1895), with a ruling of 5–4, was a landmark case in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the unapportioned income taxes on interest, dividends and rents imposed by the Income Tax Act of 1894 were, in effect, direct taxes, and were unconstitutional because they violated the provision that direct taxes be apportioned. The decision was superseded in 1913 by the Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. A separate holding regarding the taxation of interest income on certain bonds was overruled by the Supreme Court in 1988 in the case of South Carolina v. Baker.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhQqkEV5Zck

Legal fictions are different from legal presumptions which assume a certain state of facts until the opposite is proved, such as the presumption of legitimacy. They are different from hypothetical examples, such as the ‘reasonable person’ which serve as tools for the court to express its reasoning. They are also different from legal principles which create a legal state of affairs that is different from the underlying facts, such as corporate personhood although these are sometimes wrongly[citation needed] called legal fictions.

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